Tag Archives: greta van der rol

A triumph for an amateur historian

This hole is the exact spot where the Batavia lay

This hole is the exact spot where the Batavia lay

Fifty years ago, the last resting place of the Dutch merchantman Batavia, which hit a reef on the Abrolhos islands off the coast of Western Australia in 1629, was finally found.

Fifty years. It had taken three hundred and eighty-four years before the wreck was finally found. It wasn’t as if the incident hadn’t been recorded. It wasn’t as if nobody went looking. In fact, a number of times people thought they’d actually found the right wreck. That’s how the Abrolhos’s Pelsaert Group got its name – people thought that’s where the Batavia lay. I must say, it seems odd that anyone believed something so obviously incorrect. The Zeewyck went down in the Pelsaert group in 1727, almost one hundred years after the Batavia. The Batavia could not have carried coins minted after 1629, which (of course) the Zeewyck did.

So why was it so hard to find the Batavia‘s wreck site? In a word, longitude. No precise method of calculating longitude was available until the late 1700s at best. I had a few things to say about longitude and how the Batavia was wrecked, here. However, mariners always attempted to record latitude and longitude for specific locations, and Adriaen Jacobsz, captain of the Batavia, was no exception. He recorded the location of the wreck as best he could. But he was wrong, so the ship’s hulk disappeared into the reef, becoming a home for sea creatures. The Abrolhos Islands themselves continued to be a hazard for sailors. As mentioned, at least one other Dutch ship, and many other vessels, were lost on these wind-swept islands, their surfaces just a few meters above the sea.

For several centuries the islands were left to the sea birds and the ghosts. Then fishermen from Geraldton, the closest town on the mainland, discovered that the warm Leeuwin current flows through these islands. Corals grow there, and pearls. Fish abound, along with the much sought-after rock lobster, known in the West as crayfish. The fishermen established fishing shacks in the Wallabi Group for the few months of the cray fishing season, but other than that, the islands kept their secrets to themselves. My guess is that the fishermen knew very well about the wreck on Morning Reef. On a clear, calm day they would have been able to see the shapes of the cannons and the tell-tale timbers. But they kept that information to themselves.

Beacon island, Traitor's Island and Morning Reef from the air

Beacon island, Traitor’s Island and Morning Reef from the air.

The person who finally told the world where the Batavia lay was Henrietta Drake-Brockman. Born into a prominent pastoral family in the Geraldton area, she researched the events surrounding the shipwreck there in 1629. She had Pelsaert’s journal translated into English, contacted Jakarta and Amsterdam for more information and – most importantly – she thought about what she’d read. She obtained a copy of Predikant Bastiaenz’s letter after his rescue, in which he described the locations he’d visited during his ordeal. From those descriptions Henrietta identified Beacon Island as the journal’s Batavia’s Graveyard. And from Bastiaenz’s remarks about sitting on a little beach from which he could see the Batavia’s two remaining masts jutting above the reef, she knew the ship was on Morning Reef.

In 1963 a team of divers, accompanied by a local fisherman, finally found the wreck site, and told the world, an absolute triumph for an amateur historian. Henrietta died not long after her book about the tragedy, Voyage to Disaster, was published in 1968.

Since the discovery, many artefacts from the vessel have been raised and brought to Fremantle’s Maritime Museum. Beacon Island’s shacks are finally deserted. Soon archaeologists will be able to excavate Beacon Island properly. I’m certain there will be more to find.

If you’d like to read more about the Abrolhos islands, I talk about my visit there, here. Do take a look at my novelisation of the wreck of the Batavia, and the fascinating, gruesome, aftermath, To Die a Dry Death.

A sneak peek at ‘Starheart’

Photo of nebulaWe interrupt our photography showcase to return to writing, which is what I do most of. You HAVE been checking my book pages, haven’t you?

I’ve returned to a book I ‘finished’ a good six months ago, a science fiction romance set in the same galaxy as ‘The Iron Admiral’. The characters are different, but we have encounters with the Galactic People’s Republic and with the ptorix, my blue-skinned, tentacled aliens. My biggest concern with this book was always that it is a mystery as well as everything else. So I have to set up clues which the protagonists must solve with all the back story that goes with a convincing plot. Most of it’s there – well – now it is.

It’s lots of fun, with the same action-packed adventure as readers will find in the Iron Admiral series and in ‘Morgan’s Choice‘. Here’s a little snippet from the first chapter. Jess Sondijk, slightly shady (but beautiful) captain of the freighter Saintly Maid has been taken over to Confederacy Battlecruiser Defender for interrogation. This is her first encounter with the ship’s admiral.

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Jess stared around her at clean, grey walls and floors and a row of no less than ten lifts. A group of people appeared from a doorway, also heading for the transit foyer. Three officers, all senior. She fixed her ‘not sure why this is happening but I’m being co-operative’ expression on her face as they approached.

Well, well, well. The captain, a senior commander and a rather dishy admiral. Tall, thick brown hair, heavy eyebrows over blue eyes that just right now were shifting his gaze all over her body and most especially down that carefully-judged split at the front of her shirt. She smiled at him, taking care to adjust her hair while she did so. Now what would a Star Fleet admiral be doing at Nordheim?

Beside her, Lieutenant Douglas and the two escorts stiffened to parade ground attention.

“What have we here, Lieutenant?” the admiral said, still staring at her.

The look in his eye sent a sexy shimmy down her spine. No prizes for guessing what was on his mind right now. And under different circumstances, she wouldn’t mind. No, not at all.

“Captain and First Officer of a suspicious ship, Sir. The Saintly Maid. They’re here for interrogation.”

Jess widened her eyes. “Suspicious ship? Oh, really, Lieutenant, you must have mistaken the Maid for some other ship.”

The admiral was grinning. The transit car the senior commander had summoned arrived with a gentle ping. The captain and the senior commander both had their bodies pointed towards the open door but the admiral lingered, gazing down at her.

“Delightful to meet you, Captain…?”

“Sondijk .And equally delightful to meet you, Admiral…?”

“Hudson. Ullric Hudson.”

She gave him a long, hard, lingering once-over, her gaze traveling slowly up his body to his eyes. “Welcome to Nordheim, Admiral Hudson.”

He chuckled, jerked his head down in a brief nod and followed the two officers into the transit.

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It’ll be published some time next year.